Tips for Becoming a Successful Student in the UK

1. Make Sure Your Workload Is Managed

Kaylie Knowles who studied at Nottingham Trent University (24), then went on to do her PGCE at Derby University. Kaylie states that it is crucial to accurately manage your workload.

She says that she was doing fine with her undergrad at Trent, but in her last year at Derby, it was extremely stressful where she experienced 4 to 5 meltdowns in that year alone.

She says it is vital to prioritise the work you have to do and to take breaks as soon as you start feeling the workload has gotten too much.

2. Plan Out Weekly Budgets

Mary O’ Connell did her English literature at York University (23) and her MA in Film Studies at King’s College in London, suggests that you set up weekly budgets.

Avoid spending all your cash on Freshers Week in student clubs in London. If you have not experienced work before university, you may not be used to having so much money at once. But keep in mind, that this money is loaned, and you should be careful when it comes to how you plan to use it.

3. Back Your Work Up

Peter Rogers graduated last year from York University (22). He advises to back your work up in two or more places.

He says all the students used Gmail accounts in university and he used Google Drive for saving everything, so means it will store in the cloud.

He also suggests saving your work in different versions as you work on things.

4. Make The Most Out Of Your First Year

Peter also mentions that your first year is often slightly lighter academically compared to the rest of your years, so make the most out of this time and enjoy it.

He also goes onto say that if the first year for a student is not counting towards their overall grade, he suggests enjoying the freedom that this year offers.

He still looks back wishing he had done less work in his first year since nobody cares about the grade he achieved in his first year. He also wished he tried out sports, activities, and spending more time with his friends.

The academic side is obviously important, but that will really start to ramp up in your 2nd and 3rd year anyway.

5. It Is Okay To Be Choosy When It Comes To Making Friends

Emmeke Megannety, a 2nd-year journalism student studying at Nottingham Trent University (21), says you won’t regret taking a bit more time to make sure you have found good friends.

People that start at uni, should keep in mind that other students that they meet in their first week, might not turn out to be their lifelong friends.

6. Look Out For Others

Unfortunately, it is a known fact that lots of students end up suffering from mental health problems, such as anxiety or depression. From recent statistics, 146 students ended up committing suicide in 2016.

Peter states that you should look out for your peers or even ask them searching questions. He also says that he was and is still frequently surprised at how many people acted and looked fine outwardly, but at the same time, they were really struggling.

He says the key is to talk directly, especially when it comes to men. He says that he knows that if someone asked him a simple question such as “How are you feeling?”, he would most likely get around this question using a very generic answer.

Yet if a friend had to ask “Do you think your mental health has been affected by….?” he suggests that most people would probably give a more honest answer.